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Blog fixed… I think…

Blog fixed… I think…

After carefully examining what I could of the HTML code in my WordPress installation, I concluded that the best way to get rid of the reported injected spam links was to “nuke the entire site from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.” – in other words, back up the blog database, delete all WordPress files, re-install WordPress and then import the backed-up database. I had contemplated moving my blog over to somewhere else, like LiveJournal or wordpress.com but I thought I’d give Dreamhost one more chance.

Of course, I’m going to take some better precautions, as recommended by some friends. These include:

WordPress plus Dreamhost = hacked WordPress blog

WordPress plus Dreamhost = hacked WordPress blog

I host my main blog on Dreamhost, using WordPress. This may have been a fatal mistake.

A while ago, someone emailed me to kindly point out that my site had somehow been hacked, and spam links injected into my HTML code. It wouldn’t appear on the site to human eyes, but it’s all there in the HTML code and picked up by Google et. al.

I changed all my passwords (Dreamhost, WordPress, FTP), removed the hacked code and thought the problem was over.

Oh no. It’s just come back. Only this time, I can’t figure out where the code is. And since I changed all the passwords to begin with, it means that either Dreamhost or WordPress has become seriously compromised. Although naturally my Google-fu is failing me and I can’t figure out where the problem’s come from. Although this post gives one indication.

Now I’m debating whether to carry on with this blog or move to yet another blogging platform like LiveJournal or something… bah… Or I could give up. It’s been six years, after all…

Spam – on the radio…

Spam – on the radio…

We’ve all had spam emails exhorting us to join some kind of home-based business scheme which promises to bring in income of thousands of dollars/pounds/yen per month while working from home.

What I’m not used to is turning on the radio – for instance, at CBS-owned WDOK Radio in Cleveland – and hearing the aural equivalent of such an advert, promising the listener thousands of dollars to work from a home-based business scheme, just by going to the ever-so-classy webaddress www.earnextraincome.com. Which then takes you to a radiocbs.theonlinebusiness.com website. So we essentially have the fourth biggest radio station owner in the United States promoting a superficial home-business scheme. Oh dear.

Oh yes, and sister company CBS Interactive owns last.fm

Why are faux spam commentators surging to my blog?

Why are faux spam commentators surging to my blog?

Over the last few days, I’ve had a lot of comments on my blog. Which is all well and good – and there’s even genuine-looking content on said comments, implying they’ve at least looked at the blogpost in question.

However, each comment leaves a link to a website of their choice, which turns out to be a purely commercial enterprise, whether it’s a weight-loss programme, a Chicago lawyer or a Southampton business directory.

Which leaves me wondering why people would take the painstaking time and effort to come to my blog, read an entry, make some comment related to the blogpost in question – all for a link from my blog. The last time I checked, my Google pagerank was 4, which isn’t exactly huge in the grand scheme of things. Besides which, WordPress automatically adds a nofollow tag to each outgoing user-submitted link, so adding links to my blog is a somewhat pointless exercise anyway.

So, faux-real spam commentators, what on earth *are* you doing here?

Can computers create?

Can computers create?

Not just yet, but they may be slowly getting there, if the latest spam comment is to be believed — assuming of course, that it was generated by computer, and not a frustrated lurid wannabe-writer. It reads:

“Only a cousin, but he was sobbingly dutiful as she drank his conservative white saga in obnoxious gulps, embedding the bitter, rationalized buff as she swallowed”

I’m sure there’s a short story in there somewhere. Probably set in a dark alley in Amsterdam or something, mind.

Of course, it’d probably help from a spammers point of view if the spam comment actually connected to a website, or a telephone number, or *something*. Instead of a nonsensical web address…

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