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Social networks deciding who our friends should be? Only on Yammer

Social networks deciding who our friends should be? Only on Yammer

Imagine you logged into your social network of choice (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) and discovered that your list of friends and contacts had been changed by the social network to reflect who THEY thought you should be following, as opposed to who you had chosen.

That’s exactly what seems to be happening with Yammer, a social network aimed more at intranets and behind company firewalls. They recently sent me an email that said:

Having used Yammer at work to have a vague idea as to what colleagues across the company are doing and interested in, they decided to send me an email this morning saying that as “My Feed” followed everyone, they were going to unilaterally unfollow everyone on my behalf.

“Here’s the thing: as Yammer networks grow in companies, we’ve learned a few things. We’ve learned that as your company network gets bigger, Following Everyone can clutter up your MyFeed and impair your ability to find what’s most relevant to you.

On Friday, October 29th, you will stop following everyone in your network. Before then, you can start following updates from specific people at *** by clicking here.

This way your MyFeed will be focused on the messages that matter to you most.”

Well, I don’t want that to happen. But helpfully, the only way – it would seem – to protest this decision is to make a meagre posting on their uservoice customer forum.

Disgraceful behaviour.

Like Glee? Then you’re a 20-something woman. Discuss.

Like Glee? Then you’re a 20-something woman. Discuss.

The geniuses at last.fm have mashed-up their data to produce a chart divided by gender/age as to what most of their users in a particular age-range and gender enjoy.

Artists grouped by their listeners' gender and age

It also allows you the option of looking at your favourite groups to find out who you’d be hanging out with at concerts. So I got …

Dear eBay seller…

Dear eBay seller…

You advertise goods for sale, and I – not unreasonably – ask to see a photo of said goods.

Asking why I want to see a photo of said goods does not necessarily engender reassurance that you have the goods on offer to begin with, y’know? Even if you do have a 400+ point feedback rating…

Doing content is easy, right?

Doing content is easy, right?

Judging by the worth by which journalists and writers are generally paid, you’d have thought writing would be an easy task, right? Something that any old mug can do on the cheap? Well, it seems that these days, some places are paying peanuts. But of course, when you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. One example I came across today:

You’re organising a week in which school children are encouraged to go to the cinema and watch films. The campaign is rather laboriously called National Schools Film Week – and you can visit their website at www.nsfw.org.

However, I’m pretty sure that most schoolkids will just giggle at the other meaning of NSFW – which is to today’s generation what the red triangle on the top-right of a film being shown on TV meant to my generation.

Those evil Last Exorcism marketeers

Those evil Last Exorcism marketeers

I’m a very jumpy person, and I hate shock videos – after an evil friend sent me one, I couldn’t face my computer for a day. I stopped playing Quake 2 when they threw an alien spider in my face, for goodness sake.

So I feel nothing but sympathy for the poor sods who were surfing Chat Roulette looking in vain for a woman to take their clothes off on camera. Then they found one who seemed to turn into a posessed devil woman – of course it turned out to be a scary viral video promoting The Last Exorcism.

If they were really strangers – then they may well be charred for life. Although I suspect that they were actually actors or people paid to surf Chat Roulette for a while – how would you get the clearance rights?

Working for the BBC….

Working for the BBC….

means a few surprises from time to time. Like telling people that it’s not a place where they shower you with money while you hang out backstage with Matt Smith or even Huw Edwards, for instance. Although there are a few fantastic non-financial bonuses, of course – like working on election night. Really must blog about that one day.

Anyway, it also makes for the occasional surprise in the rest of your life – like this ad I spotted on my Facebook page, basically begging for a job.

Suffice to say that most of the people that I know who are in a position to hire someone at the BBC don’t have Facebook accounts, as far as I know. Although I dare say the person who placed that advert would find such non-social-media people to be freaks of the highest order…

FourSquare in the UK – finally there’s a use. Oh.

FourSquare in the UK – finally there’s a use. Oh.

Like many people who use FourSquare, I often wonder if there’s actually any point to checking in to a location, aside from point scoring and the fact I’m usually bored at a bus stop.

American friends of mine tell of strange legends whereby if you show you’re a Mayor at certain locations, the staff there look kindly upon you and give you a bonus. But I thought that’d never come here.

Until I heard that the West12 Shopping Centre in Shepherds Bush is offering a free SuperShake to the Mayor of that location in any one week. They’re incredibly active on the social media front, what with having a Twitter feed and a Facebook page.

Unfortunately, social media can only go so far. The reality of the West12 Shopping Centre is that it was a slightly dowdy and dying shopping mall even before the heavy big-guns of Westfield moved in opposite. There’s a gym, a supermarket, a cinema and a pub but most of the units are to let and there’s nothing there to draw people in aside from for the basic needs of the week.

So how are companies in the UK actually using FourSquare? Or is it doomed to go the way of the even more pointless Twitter game Spymaster, which at one point everyone seemed to be playing until they all realised it was useless and had no end goal?

You can link in any time you like…

You can link in any time you like…

LinkedIn has become the defacto premiere website for making business connections, so as a consequence all these groups have sprung up promising to connect you to more and more people. I joined a few groups, but they weren’t quite what I was looking for. So I wanted to leave a group.

You’d have thought a website dedicated to business professionals would make it easy to do what you need to do – like leaving a group. But oh no.

You can’t leave a group from your group settings page. Oh no, that’d be far too obvious.

Instead, you have to go to a listing of all your groups, and click on the tiny word that says Actions by each link. And I had to do that by consulting the Help page.

LinkedIn, sort it out!

(Headline courtesy of @suitov)

When ping doesn't get you much pong

When ping doesn't get you much pong




Yahoo! Ping Pong-23

Originally uploaded by Ping London

(In other words, great, you got sponsorship, where’s the return?)

Across London, ping pong tables have sprouted up to encourage Londoners to have a go at ping pong/whiff whaff. All nicely decorated with the various sponsors’ logos, including Yahoo!

Accompanying these tables are some leaflets about the Ping London project, which also – of course – encourage you to share your participation, by using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or maybe even Flickr

Note that of those four websites, only one belongs to Yahoo – one of the main sponsors.

Surely a major dotcom company, upon committing some sponsorship money to a project, would want their websites or services to be promoted – perhaps Buzz or Pulse – alongside the rest of the web offerings?

Who on earth is Margaret Atwood?

Who on earth is Margaret Atwood?

Edit: Ahhh, the author behind The Handmaid’s Tale. Must read it one day.

I write like
Margaret Atwood

I Write Like by Mémoires, Mac journal software. Analyze your writing!

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