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Beowulf – you'll wet your pants!

Beowulf – you'll wet your pants!

I’ve just come back from seeing a preview of Beowulf in the best possible scenario – at an IMAX screen in 3D. Let me tell you, it’s a cinematic marvel.

I hadn’t heard anything about it at all until the other day, when Angelina Jolie and Anthony Hopkins swooped in for the premiere. So I kinda knew it was computer-generated using virtual motion capture for the acting – which I had a bad feeling about because I really hated The Polar Express.

But I needn’t have worried. The actors looked like the actors – hell, forget computer graphics. That *was* Angelina Jolie rising out of the water, as sexy as ever. Even if she did have a scaly tail and impossibly beautiful (if spherical) breasts covered in mud. The sooner cinema gets to the point when you can take home your own computer-genreated 3D model of your favourite character as you leave the auditorium, the better. Seriously, the friend I took with me had no idea the acting was computer-animated. She knew something was slightly off, but she assumed it was a side-effect from the blurriness of the 3D IMAX format.

Over here, it seems to have been given a 12A rating. Which is so wrong. The first minute lulls you into a false sense of comfortableness, before it’s all blown apart in five harrowing minutes of gore, up close in CGI.

Once I got home, of course I had to look it up on Wikipedia. And while a lot of it did seem to have the Hollywood treatment, I was surprised at how much of it had been “changed” from the original story. Then again, the original tale has probably been augmented a lot (to say the least) over the years…

2 Comments

  • Ooh, I'm so jealous. I've been waiting for this for AGES! It's been in the works for a decade.

    In defence of the script-writing team, they have come right out and said that it's quite different from the original epic poem. It's not so much an application of Hollywoodness but a way of story-telling that fits with our age. And while I haven't seen the film, I read an interview with Gaiman that explained why they upped the role of Grendel's mother in the movie. Subtext. And, tada, here it is.

    Incidentally, the Seamus Heaney translation makes good reading.

  • It’s not so much an application of Hollywoodness but a way of story-telling that fits with our age. And while I haven’t seen the film, I read an interview with Gaiman that explained why they upped the role of Grendel’s mother in the movie. Subtext. And, tada, here it is.

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